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Contested Jewish Futures:
Recovering an Era of Ferment and Possibility
in Jewish Life

Tuesday, February 2, 9:00am-3:00pm
Wednesday, February 3, 9:00am-12:30pm

Dobbs University Center (DUC), Room E-338

This symposium, organized by Miriam Udel, Associate Professor of Yiddish and Jewish Studies (Emory University), and Nick Block, Visiting Assistant Professor of German Studies (Emory University), will focus on the decades from 1880-1950, a time of cultural, political, and economic ferment in Euro-American Jewish communities, when thinkers, writers, and artists generated a host of platforms and ideas about what shape the Jewish future would take in the twentieth century. Leading scholars from Emory and elsewhere will gather to present papers and discuss the wide array of possibilities for Jewish life – many now forgotten – that this vibrant, often stormy period generated. Examining phenomena such as language politics, utopian movements, and developments in popular and youth culture, the participants will consider how these trends both emerged from and further shaped the era’s views of what the future would hold.

Participants include
Nick Block, Emory University
Andrea F. Bohlman, University of North Carolina
Marc Caplan, University of Michigan
Kevin C. Karnes, Emory University
Anita Norich, University of Michigan
Noam Pianko, University of Washington
Hannah Pollin-Galay, University of Pennsylvania
Na'ama Rokem, University of Chicago
Anna Shternshis, University of Toronto
Miriam Udel, Emory University
Steven J. Zipperstein, Stanford University

See below for symposium schedule. All sessions are free and open to the public.

This scholarly event is cosponsored by the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry; Laney Graduate School; Department of History; Institute of the Liberal Arts; Graduate Division of Religion; Department of Religion; Department of German Studies; Department of Comparative Literature; Program in Russian, Eurasian, & East European Studies.


Keynote Lecture
2016 Tenenbaum Family Lecture in Judaic Studies

Catastrophe and the Contemporary Jewish Imagination:
The 1903 Kishinev Pogrom as Fact and Fiction

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

7:30pm
Reception Hall
Michael C. Carlos Museum
Emory University

zipperstein

Steven J. Zipperstein

Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish History and Culture
Stanford University

Kishinev’s pogrom of 1903 was the first event in Russian Jewish life to receive international attention. Why did it have this impact, and why did it provide the prism through which so much of the contemporary Jewish experience would be seen?

Reception following the lecture.

This lecture is cosponsored by the Hightower Fund; Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry; Laney Graduate School; Department of History; Institute of the Liberal Arts; Graduate Division of Religion; Department of Religion; Department of German Studies; Department of Comparative Literature; Program in Russian, Eurasian, & East European Studies.


Event and visitor parking is available in the Peavine parking lot after 4:00pm,
in the Fishburne deck after 6:00pm, and in the Oxford Road parking deck after 7:00pm.
Visit Emory's Transportation and Parking Services p
age for maps and more information.


Symposium Schedule

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

9:15am
Introduction and Welcome
Conveners: Miriam Udel and Nick Block
Emory University

10:00am
Panel I: Backward to Go Forward: A Return to Origins
Moderator: Eric Goldstein, Emory University

Noam Pianko
University of Washington
The Origins of Peoplehood and the Future of Jewish Collectivity

Nick Block
Emory University
Tales of the German-Jewish Future: Fear, Destruction, and Yiddish Takeovers

Marc Caplan
University of Michigan
Arnold Schoenberg’s Jewish Trauerspiel: The Status of Language, Law, and Symbol in Moses und Aron

12:00pm
Break for Lunch

1:30pm
Panel II: Listening to the Future at the Chasm’s Edge
Moderator: Peter Höyng, Emory University

Anna Shternshis
University of Toronto
Imagining Jewish Future in 1942: Soviet Red Army Soldiers Singing in Yiddish

Kevin C. Karnes
Emory University
Listening Together: Aurality and the Everyday in Riga before the Shoah

3:00pm
Break

7:30pm
Tenenbaum Family Lecture in Judaic Studies
Steven J. Zipperstein
Stanford University
Catastrophe and the Contemporary Jewish Imagination: The 1903 Kishinev Pogrom as Fact, and Fiction

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

9:00am
P
anel III: Socialist Past and Futures
Moderator: Cornelia Wilhelm, Emory University

Miriam Udel
Emory University
To Instruct, Delight and Indoctrinate: Politics and Poetics in Soviet and American Children's Literature Between the Wars

Hannah Pollin-Galay
University of Pennsylvania
Remembering Our Beautiful Future: Communist Jewish Holocaust Survivors Look Back at the 1930s

Andrea F. Bohlman
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Anthologies of the Voice: Recollecting Polish-Jewish Futures in Sound

11:00am
Panel IV: The Future of Translations
Moderator: Elena Glazov-Corrigan, Emory University

Na’ama Rokem
University of Chicago
Jewish Politics in all the Languages of the World: Multilingualism and Contingency in Hannah Arendt

Anita Norich
University of Michigan
Contesting Translations
: The Future of Yiddish in English


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Last updated: February 1, 2016

 

 

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