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Tenenbaum Family Lecture Series

Previous Semesters:

Fall 2014 - Spring 2015
Fall 2013 - Spring 2014

Spring 2013
Fall 2012

Calendar of Events

Unless otherwise noted, all events are free and open to the public. Check back often for changes and additions to this schedule.

Parking is available in the Peavine visitors parking lot after 4:00pm, in the Fishburne deck after 6:00pm, and in the Oxford Road parking deck after 7:00pm. See Emory's Transportation and Parking Services page for more information.

E-mail jewishstudies@emory.edu to subscribe to our events mailing list!


Fall 2017
Celebrating 40 Years of Jewish Studies at Emory

September 12, 2017

David Hirsh
"Contemporary Antisemitism on the Left"

Oxford Road Presentation Room at 7:30 pm.

For more information, click here.

 

 


Past Events: Fall 2016 - Spring 2017

 

Thursday, April 20, 2017

End of the Year Reception
Please join the students, faculty and staff of the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies to celebrate the end of the 2016 - 2017 academic year, featuring the presentation of the Blumenthal Awards and student research and travel grants.

Candler Library 212 at 4 pm.

Click here for a report on the event.

 

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Film Night: Munich ’72 and Beyond
Join us for a screening of "Munich '72 and Beyond: A Film of Redemption, a Monument of Remembrance," commemorating the 11 Israeli athletes who were killed in the Munich massacre at the 1972 Olympics. The film will be followed by a Q&A with the producer, Dr. Steven Ungerleider.

7:00 pm at White Hall Room 208, Emory University

 

 


March 27-29, 2017

Looking Outward: Reframing Jewish Studies
A conference bringing together Emory faculty and visiting scholars to assess recent trends in Jewish Studies and propose an exciting agenda for transforming the field in the Twenty-First Century

For more details on times and locations click here.

 

 

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Craig Perry
"Black Slave Women and Their Jewish Children in the Middle Ages"

3:30pm in Candler Library 125

For more information, click here.

 

Friday, March 17, 2017

Heather Julien
"Stella Suberman's The Jew Store: A Family Memoir and Jewish Atlantic Migrations"

11:30am in Candler Library 212

For more information, click here.

 

dgrossmanTuesday, February 28, 2017

David Grossman
Twentieth Anniversary of the Tenenbaum Family Lecture in Judaic Studies, featuring celebrated Israeli novelist, David Grossman

7:30pm in White Hall 208

For more information, click here.

 

Sunday, December 4, 2016

2:00 - 9:00pm
Cox Hall Ballroom

Community of Scholars Showcase: Celebrate forty years of Jewish Studies at Emory with the “Community of Scholars Showcase,” when some of Emory’s leading professors will share insights from their teaching and research. Beginning at 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, December 4, 2016, in Cox Hall Ballroom on the Emory campus, the showcase will also feature a session on recent faculty books, and will culminate in a celebratory dinner.

For a full schedule, click here.

The public is invited. For more information on schedule, fees, and registration, please see
HTTP://ENGAGE.EMORY.EDU/JEWISHSTUDIES40.

 

defying nazisTuesday, September 13, 2016

Defying the the Nazis: The Sharps' War
A Film by Ken Burns & Artemis Joukowsky

7:00pm in the Center for Ethics
Reservation required
Find more information and registration here

Cosponsored by the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies

 



uncle samWednesday, September 14, 2016

Closing the Gates, Building a Wall: What the History of Immigration Restriction Against Jews Can Teach Us About American Nativism
Annual Jacob M. Rothschild Memorial Lecture

Alan M. Kraut
American University
Libby Garland
Kingsborough Community College, The City University of New York

7:30pm in the Oxford Presentation Room


Past Events: Fall 2015 - Spring 2016

Thursday, September 10, 2015riklis
Of Conflict and Optimism: My Personal Cinematic Voyage
Eran Riklis
Filmmaker in Residence
7:30pm in White Hall 207
Part of Forging Cinematic Identities, a series of events featuring films and lectures by the Israeli filmmaker

Wednesday, October 14, 2015
The Age of Race: Judaism, Ethics, and the Invisible Seductions of Racism
Susannah Heschel
Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies, Dartmouth College
7:30pm at Oxford Presentation Auditorium
Annual Rothschild Memorial Lecture and keynote lecture for Race With Jewish Ethics symposium

Tuesday, November 17, 2015 at 4:00pm
How Ordinary Are Ordinary Perpetrators?
Abram de Swaan

Professor of Social Science (Emeritus), University of Amsterdam
Oxford Presentation Auditorium, Oxford Road Building
Sponsored by Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies; cosponsored by the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies; the Departments of Economics, Political Science, and Sociology; The Institute of African Studies; the James Weldon Johnson Institute; the Laney Graduate School; and the Quality Enhancement Plan

Sunday, January 24, 2016 at 3:00pm
Samson in Stone: New Discoveries in the Ancient Synagogue in Israel's Galilee
Jodi Magness

Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, Department of Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Sponsored by Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies; cosponsored by the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies; the Program in Mediterranean Archaeology; Departments of Art History and Religion; and the Graduate Division of Religion

Tuesday, February 2 - Wednesday, February 3, 2016
Contested Jewish Futures: A Symposium

Dobbs University Center (DUC), Room E-338

ZippersteinTuesday, February 2, 2016 at 7:30pm

Steven J. Zipperstein

Daniel E. Koshland Professor of Jewish Culture and History, Stanford University
Carlos Museum Reception Hall
Annual Tenenbaum Lecture and keynote lecture for Contested Jewish Futures symposium



Tuesday, March 22 at 4:00pm

Learning From the Germans

Dr. Susan Neimann
Director of the Einstein Forum
Potsdam, Germany

In this presentation on her latest book project, Dr. Neiman will give a brief introduction to German postwar Vergangenheitsaufarbeitung (working through the past), compare it with what is going on in the United States vis-à-vis its own national crimes, both concerning foreign policy and more particularly the legacies of slavery and segregation, and begin to suggest what could and could not be learned from the German example.

Modern Languages Building 201

Sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, Department of German Studies, Hightower Fund , James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference, and Tam Institute for Jewish Studies


Monday, March 28 at 7:30pm

After Paris: Antisemitism, Jewish-Muslim Relations, and the Future of French Jews

a scholarly forum featuring


Maud Mandel
Brown University
and
Samuel Ghiles-Meilhac
University of Paris VIII, Saint-Denis

The last decade has seen a dramatic rise in the number of violent attacks on Jews in France, sparking widespread discussion about the nature of European antisemitism and the future of France’s second-largest ethno-religious minority. Is contemporary antisemitism in France part of a longer history of European hostility toward Jews, or is it a phenomenon emanating primarily from the legacy of French colonialism in North Africa? Are the attacks on Jews an outgrowth of the current wave of Islamist terrorism or the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, or are they rooted in domestic tensions between French Jews and Muslims? Do these trends threaten to uproot Europe’s largest Jewish community? Debate over such questions has reached a fever pitch in both Europe and America in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo shootings of January 2015, the Paris attacks of November 2015, and the unprecedented rise in Jewish emigration from France. As British journalist Natasha Lehrer has recently suggested, “it is almost as if the fate of French Jewry is seen as a cipher for widespread, even existential, fears about the future of Europe itself.” Professors Mandel and Ghiles-Meilhac will bring their knowledge of French Jewish history, Jewish-Muslim relations, and contemporary French life to bear in analyzing this complex and consequential story.

two soldiers


Oxford Presentation Auditorium

311 Oxford Road Building
1390 Oxford Road
Atlanta 30307

Join us for a reception following the lecture


This program is made possible by the Waxman Support Fund, which promotes scholarly research, teaching, and public programming at Emory on topics related to antisemitism, the Holocaust, and relations between Jews and other communities.

Cosponsored by Department of French & Italian, Department of German Studies, Department of History, Department of Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies, Department of Religion, European Studies Project, Graduate Division of Religion, and Institute of African Studies


Sunday, April 3, 2:00-4:00pm

Reading the Telling: The Passover Haggadah Across Time and Place
EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION

Each Spring, Passover is celebrated by thousands of Emory faculty, staff, and students. This year the celebration will be accompanied by the first major exhibit of Haggadot by an Emory library.

poster
This exhibit is curated by doctoral student Adam T. Strater, in collaboration with TIJS, and will run from March 7 through June 30, 2016 in the new exhibit gallery of the Pitts Theology Library. The exhibit materials, spanning international Haggadot from the last four centuries, are drawn from the collections of the Pitts Library, the Rose Library, the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum, and the holdings of private Atlanta collectors. For further information can be found here.

The exhibit is open to the public at no charge, during regular library hours. Docent-led tours are also available by appointment or on select Fridays at 2:00pm. Contact Rebekah Bedard at to arrange a tour, or register here.


Pitts Library Lecture Hall

1531 Dickey Drive; Atlanta, GA 30322

 



Past Events: Fall 2014 - Spring 2015

Friday, September 5 - Saturday, September 6, 2014

Heidegger's Black Notebooks Conference
Emory Conference Center

This conference is devoted to Heidegger’s recently published Black Notebooks. These notebooks contain Heidegger’s private political ruminations from the years 1931-1944, including his conception of National Socialism; they also evince a strain of anti-Semitism in his thinking hitherto unknown. The Emory conference features the editor of the notebooks, Peter Trawny, along with an interdisciplinary group of scholars to explore these issues along with broader concerns such as the relation of philosophy to politics, the role of the intellectual in society, the problem of modernity, and the tension between the public and the private.

For more information, visit http://philosophy.emory.edu/home/news/conferences.html or contact the conference organizer at andrew.j.mitchell@emory.edu.

Sunday, October 5, 2014

Mediterranean Archaeology Lecture Series

“A Suitable Place for a Wedding and a Miracle: Finding the True Cana of Galilee”

Professor Tom McCollough (Centre College)

3:00pm
Carlos Museum Reception Hall

On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee… (John 2:1)

So where is this village of Cana of Galilee in which Jesus performed the miracle of changing water to wine and thereby for the first time revealed his glory (John 2:11)? Over time, there have been as many as five different places identified as the biblical Cana of Galilee. The ongoing archaeological excavations at Khirbet Qana, a site just north of Nazareth on the northern edge of the Bet Netofa Valley, have exposed the ruins of a first century C.E. Jewish village and compelling evidence that this is in fact the true Cana of Galilee. By way of literary clues, ancient maps and close looks at the results of the excavations of Khirbet Qana, this lecture will investigate the quest for the true Cana and how the ongoing excavations of Khirbet Qana may have finally solved the mystery of finding the elusive Cana of Galilee.

This lecture is sponsored by the Program in Mediterranean Archaeology, the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, and the Michael C. Carlos Museum. The event is free and open to the public.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

TEACH-IN AGAINST HATE

On Sunday, October 5, 2014, members of Emory’s chapter of AEPi, an historically Jewish fraternity, woke up to find their house on Eagle Row vandalized with swastikas, the Nazi symbol of hatred. This troubling event raises important questions, not only about antisemitism, but about all forms of bigotry and hatred and how we can best respond to them. In order to answer this hateful act in a way that honors the values of Emory University and the academy more broadly, the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies invites the Emory community to a “teach-in,” where faculty members representing different backgrounds and academic disciplines will help us examine important questions, such as:

  • Why does one case of antisemitic graffiti matter?
  • Why should we care if we do not belong to the group targeted in this incident?
  • How can we combat racism and prejudice of all kinds in our everyday lives?
  • What opportunities does the university setting provide for us in addressing racism and prejudice?

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 3:00pm
MAIN QUADRANGLE, STEPS OF THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

Young Ross, Gillespie, Kuhr, Lipstadt, Goldstein

BRIDGETTE YOUNG ROSS, Dean of the Chapel and Spiritual Life
ANDRA GILLESPIE, Interim Chair, Department of African American Studies
JACK KUHR, President, Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity
DEBORAH E. LIPSTADT, Dorot Chair, Modern Jewish & Holocaust Studies, Department of Religion
ERIC L. GOLDSTEIN, Director, Tam Institute for Jewish Studies

For more information, call the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies at 404.727.6301

This event is cosponsored by the Office of Spiritual & Religious Life, the Inter-Religious Council,
the Department of African American Studies, Emory Hillel, Emory Chabad, and Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity

See more coverage regarding the act of vandalism, the Teach-In,
and other responses from the Emory community in
the Emory Report and the Emory Wheel


Sunday, November 2, 2014

Mediterranean Archaeology Lecture Series

“The Rise of the Philistines at the Seaport of Ashkelon”
Professor Daniel Master (Wheaton College)

At the end of the Late Bronze Age around 1200 B.C., the world of the East-ern Mediterranean was in a state of upheaval. The ancient empires were collapsing, and new groups were competing to fill the void. Over the last 25 years of excavation, the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon has uncovered evidence which reveals how the seaport of Ashkelon was transformed from a Canaanite fortress under Egyptian domination to an independent Philistine seaport, setting the stage for a new Iron Age.

3:00pm at the Carlos Museum, Reception Hall

The lecture is sponsored by the Program in Mediterranean Archaeology, the Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies, and the Michael C. Carlos Museum.

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

C. GreenbergThe Sixth Annual Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild Memorial Lecture

“Civil Rights vs. Civil Liberties: Black and Jewish Debates over Hate Speech Laws”
Cheryl Greenberg, Trinity College
Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of History

Nazis at SkokieThe United States is one of the few western nations without any legal protection against racially or religiously offensive materials or symbols. Most Americans, citing our constitutional free speech protections, are comfortable with this. But how did civil rights agencies see it? We will examine debates within Black and Jewish agencies over the most effective ways to protest offensive materials and explore the related question of to what extent legal protests can in themselves serve as censorship.

7:30pm at the Oxford Presentation Auditorium
1390 Oxford Road, Atlanta 30322
Followed by a Reception

This lecture is generously supported by the Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild Memorial Endowment Fund.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

“The Inadequacy of the Term ‘Influence’ in Biblical Studies.”
Jonathan Ben-Dov
George and Florence Wise Chair of Judaism in the Ancient World
University of Haifa

3:00pm in the Pitts Theology Library Lecture Hall
Candler School of Theology 360

Generously cosponsored by the Graduate Division of Religion and the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies

Friday, December 5, 2014

Brown Bag Lunch

"Trust and Distrust in US-Israel Relations and Middle East Peacemaking Since 1967"
Ziv Rubinovitzbroken flags
Visiting Professor
Department of History

Making peace in the Middle East requires American security guarantees to Israel; however, often Israel seems distrustful of US assurances and guarantees. This paper argues that unless the patron state (US) has an indispensable need for the existence of the client (Israel), real trust is not possible, hence guarantees are not effective. Analyzing US-Israel relations from 1967 to the present, the paper suggests that the “special relationship” between the US and Israel does not create unconditional trust, and that American leverage in the peacemaking process is therefore limited.

11:30am in Candler Library 212
Bring your lunch ~ drinks and desserts will be provided


Thursday, February 5, 2015

The 2nd Annual Maximilian Aue Memorial Lecture

"The Hidden Rabe: Kafka's Openings and Beckett's Cage"
David Suchoff

Professor of English, Colby College

4:00pm in White Hall 103

Sponsored by the Department of German Studies and Cosponsored by TIJS

Thursday, February 5, 2015

Evening Lecture

Snyder"The Holocaust as a Political History"
Timothy Snyder

Housum Professor of History, Yale University
and author of Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

How could the Holocaust have happened? Hitler conceived of the Jews as a planetary threat, but only war in a particular part of the world allowed the mass killing to begin. This lecture explores the world as Hitler saw it and seeks to demonstrate how the destruction of states permitted new forms of politics that enabled, to a shocking degree, the realization of that vision.

7:30pm at the Oxford Presentation Auditorium
1390 Oxford Road, Atlanta 30307
Followed by a Reception

Professor Snyder's visit is generously sponsored by the Dean of Emory College of Arts and Sciences; the Halle Institute for Global Learning; the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies; Emory's Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program (REEES)the Department of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures (REALC); the Institute for the Liberal Arts (ILA); the Jean Monnet Center of Excellence, Sam Nunn School of International Relations, Georgia Institute of Technology; and the LaBelle Birnbaum Tenenbaum Fund.

Friday, February 6, 2015

Faculty-Graduate Student Seminar

"Ukraine: A War of Truth"
Timothy Snyder

Housum Professor of History, Yale University
and author of Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin

The conflict in Ukraine has unfolded as a number of levels simultaneously. A revolution, counter-revolution, and Russian war of aggression have been accompanied by an impressive, perhaps unprecedented, campaign of multi-media propaganda. Discerning the difference between myth and fact on central issues such as the Jewish question, the role of nationalism, and the nature of the war is an important exercise, not least because of that it reveals about the problems of our own culture.

4:00pm
White Hall 208

Professor Snyder's visit is generously sponsored by the Dean of Emory College of Arts and Sciences; the Halle Institute for Global Learning; the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies; Emory's Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program (REEES)the Department of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures (REALC); the Institute for the Liberal Arts (ILA); the Jean Monnet Center of Excellence, Sam Nunn School of International Relations, Georgia Institute of Technology; and the LaBelle Birnbaum Tenenbaum Fund.


<CANCELLED> Wednesday, February 25, 2015

"Doctors without Borders? The Patient-Practitioner-Relationship and Jewish Christian Encounters in the Early Modern Period"
Robert Juette
Professor of the History of Medicine
Stuttgart University

4:00pm
ILA Conference Room, Callaway S-423

This lecture is cosponsored by the Institute of the Liberal Arts


Thursday, February 26, 2015

2015 Tenenbaum Lecture with Sarah Bunim Benor

Associate Professor of Contemporary Jewish Studies
Hebrew Union College, Jewish Institute of Religion


BenorBecoming Frum: How Newcomers Learn
the Language and Culture of Orthodox Judaism

Watch video of Professor Benor's lecture!

There is more to becoming Orthodox than observing religious laws. Newly Orthodox Jews, or ba’alei teshuva (lit. ‘those who return’), encounter a very different culture, including new ways of talking, dressing, and acting. Focusing on the Yiddish and Hebrew words used by English-speaking Orthodox Jews, this lecture explores how “BTs” integrate into the community partly by taking on these new practices.

7:30pm
Reception Hall
Michael C. Carlos Museum
Emory University

This event is free and open to the public
Please join us for a reception following the lecture
Free parking available at Fishburne and Peavine Parking Decks

The 2015 Tenenbaum lecture is sponsored by:

The Tam Institute for Jewish Studies
The Hightower Fund
The Laney Graduate School
The Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry
The Graduate Division of Religion
The Department of History
The Department of Religion
The Department of Middle Eastern and South Asian Studies
The Department Anthropology
The Department of Sociology
The Program in Linguistics

Driving Directions to Emory Campus

Directions to Fishburne deck

Map of Fishburne Deck and Carlos Museum

Printable Map | Past Tenenbaum Lectures

scrollsWednesday, March 18 and Thursday, March 19, 2015

Jews, Texts, and Ethnography: An Academic Workshop

The Jewish people, the People of the Book, have long been associated with the study of texts as one of the most basic practices upon which the religion and, indeed, the culture are built. Yet anthropology has only rarely considered the meaning of those texts or the ways in which texts influence individuals and communities, and Jewish Studies has historically maintained a certain distance from the field of anthropology.

This interdisciplinary workshop aims to break new ground in the field of ethnography of texts in Jewish life. Leading scholars from around the world will gather to present papers and discuss the relationship between text, lived experience, and ethnography in Jewish studies. It is expected that the workshop will result in an edited collection of theoretical and methodological reflections on the use of ethnographic techniques to examine the place of texts and textuality in Jewish life, with relevance for the study ofother cultures as well.

Participants include
James Bielo, Miami University
Jonathan Boyarin, Cornell University
Marcy Brink-Danan, Hebrew University
Sam Cooper, Bar Ilan University
Simon Dein, Durham University
Ayala Fader, Fordham University
Michael Karlin, Life University
Lea Taragin-Zeller, Hebrew University
Philip Wexler, Hebrew University

Hosted by
Don Seeman, Emory University
Shlomo Guzmen-Carmeli, Bar Ilan University

Winship Ballroom
Dobbs University Center


All sessions are free and open to the public (excluding invitation-only meals)

This event is cosponsored by the Candler School of Theology, the Laney Graduate School, the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, the Graduate Division of Religion, the Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts, and the Departments of Comparative Literature, Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies, and Religion.


Wednesday, March 18, 2015

brillA Rabbi on the Ganges: A Jewish Hindu Encounter

Alan Brill
Cooperman-Ross Endowed Professor
Seton Hall University

with respondent
Jonathan Boyarin, Mann Professor of Modern Jewish Studies, Cornell University

Professor Brill recently spent a sabbatical in India teaching Judaism and encountering Hinduism from within the Brahmin world. He notes that Indian works on religion typically reference Judaism based on the ancient practices of Leviticus, with its animal sacrifice, while Judaism understands Indian religions using the categories of Talmudic understanding of idolatry. Neither side understands much about the other one and its living reality. Exploring the commonalities of ideas on priestly rituals, purity, meditation, and text study, this talk will look at how what is first seen as completely other and foreign, can, with asking the proper questions and an appropriate lens, be appreciated on its own terms and create a space for a shared spiritual language of understanding.

7:30pm
Oxford Presentation Auditorium

311 Oxford Road Building
1390 Oxford Road; Atlanta 30307

Reception following the lecture

This lecture is the keynote event of the conference, “Jews, Texts, and Ethnography: An Academic Workshop,” presented by the Tam Institute for Jewish Studies and the Hightower Fund and cosponsored by the Candler School of Theology, the Laney Graduate School, the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, the Graduate Division of Religion, the Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts, and the Departments of Comparative Literature, Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies, and Religion.

 

Spring 2015

Monday, March 23, 2015

The Dark and Surreal World of Etgar Keret

7:00pm
Marcus Hillel Center at Emory


keret


Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Jewish Ethics and Disability Justice

Julia Watts Belser
Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies
Georgetown University

5:00 - 6:30pm
Center for Ethics, Room 162


Professor Belser’s research brings ancient texts into conversation with disability studies, queer theory, feminist thought, and environmental ethics. Her work focuses on classical Jewish responses to drought and disaster, portrayals of sexual violence in rabbinic responses to enslavement and empire, as well as gender, disability, and the dissident body in late antiquity.

This lecture is sponsored by the Center for Ethics and is part of the Raymond F. Schinazi Program in Religion and Bioethics.


Friday, March 27, 2015

Vann Seminar Public Talk
“Philipp Friedrich Jäger and the Criminal Case against ‘Jew Süss,’ 1737-1738”

Dr. Yair Mintzker
Assistant Professor of History
Princeton University

4:00pm
323 Bowden Hall (The J. Russell Major Seminar Room)

Joseph Süsskind Oppenheimer (“Jew Süss”) is one of the most iconic figures in the history of anti-Semitism. Originally from the Jewish community in Heidelberg, in 1733 Oppenheimer became the court Jew of Carl Alexander, the duke of the small German state of Württemberg. When Carl Alexander died unexpectedly in March 1737, the Württemberg authorities arrested Oppenheimer, put him on trial, and condemned him to death for unspecified “misdeeds.” He was executed on February 4, 1738. In order to understand what happened to Oppenheimer one must first of all get to know his accusers. The lecture will focus on the figure of Philipp Friedrich Jäger, the principal inquisitor in the infamous criminal case against “Jew Süss.” He is most often remembered today through the vicious Nazi propaganda movie (directed by Veit Harlan) made about him in 1940.

This lecture is presented by the Department of History and cosponsored by TIJS, the German Studies Department, and the Bill & Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry (CHIPS Fund).

Monday, March 30, 2015

The Brickman-Levin Symposium

brickman-levin


Celebrate the establishment of the Brickman-Levin Fellowships supporting PhD-level work in Jewish Studies. Honor Dr. Perry Brickman and the late Arthur Levin,the community leaders who played a crucial role in bringing the story of discrimination at Emory’s Dental School tolight.

The program will highlight recent Laney Graduate School alumni:

  • Marian Broida 13PhD – Hebrew Bible, Graduate Division of Religion
  • Michael Karlin 14PhD – American Religious Cultures, Graduate Division of Religion
  • Craig Perry 14PhD – Medieval Mediterranean History, Graduate Program in History

7:30pm
Woodruff Library, Jones Room


Dessert reception to follow

RSVP by March 25
Learn more about and consider making a gift to the Brickman-Levin Fund

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Last updated: August 9, 2017

 

 

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